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DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE

developed by MoRich

 by Mo Pinel



Introduction

The benefits of modern bowling balls are generally well documented and acknowledged.  With aggressive coverstocks, a stronger Preferred Spin Axis (PSA), and lower RGs, they are more responsive at the break point and create better pin carry.  To date, very little attention has been paid to the versatility shown by adjusting the drilling technique to maximize the performance of these balls for every bowler.  What would you say if I told you there was a drilling system that would allow a ball driller to get the best ball reaction for every bowler on every lane condition every time?  What if I told you it was easy to do?  Think of how much that would benefit every bowler and every ball driller.  Our recent study using three dimensional CAD programming demonstrates how ball dynamics can drastically be changed to benefit every style of bowler on every lane condition by using different drilling layouts.  This study shows the key to maximizing the performance of modern bowling balls is in the hands of the ball driller and in the drilling layout chosen for each ball.  Modern technology has allowed us to pinpoint the science of ball drilling to improve the scores of all bowlers by using this system.  The DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE, developed by MoRich, provides the ball driller with an easy, effective and accurate method of choosing the best layout to match every bowler to every lane condition.  Using this system will let a ball driller set up an effective arsenal for every bowler.  VIVA TECHNOLOGY!

The DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE, developed by MoRich, consists of three components which allow a ball driller to better benefit every bowler.  This system describes the drilling in terms of a drilling angle, a distance from the pin to the positive axis point (PAP) and an angle between the pin to PAP line and the vertical axis line (VAL).  It’s as simple as that.  One example of the terminology of used with this system is:  “…a 10° drilling, pin 4" from the PAP, 20° to the VAL”.  Another example is:  “…a 90° drilling, pin 5" from the PAP, 70° to the VAL”.  The descriptions of the drillings involve two different angles and a distance from the pin to the PAP.  This drilling technique works for all pin out bowling balls with both symmetrical and asymmetrical cores. The pin to PAP measurement is done the same for both types of balls.  The second angle, the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL, is also done identically for both types of balls.

Examples of Dual Angle Layouts



The Drilling Angle 

The first angle is a different measurement for the two types of balls, which are balls with both symmetrical and asymmetrical cores.  The first angle is referred to as the “drilling” angle.  The drilling angle for a ball with a symmetrical core measures the angle between a line drawn from the pin through the center of gravity (cg) and the line drawn from the pin through the PAP.  For ball with an asymmetrical core, the drilling angle measures the angle between the line drawn from the pin to the preferred spin axis (PSA) of the ball and the line drawn from the pin through the PAP.  The PSA of an asymmetrical cored ball also denotes the high RG axis of the ball and is referred to as the “mass bias” mark on the ball.  The vast majority of manufacturers mark the PSA with a locator pin or a symbol.  But, be careful because one manufacturer has chosen to mark the intermediate RG axis on one of their balls with a symbol and a locator pin instead of the PSA.  Do your research.  The pin on both types of balls is the low RG axis of the ball.  The reason the drilling angle is different for both types of balls is that a ball with a symmetrical core does not have a PSA before drilling.  A ball with an asymmetrical core DOES have a PSA before drilling which allows the driller to draw the line from the pin to the PSA. 


The drilling angle has been used by some manufacturers to identify drilling techniques for some time now.  Lou Marquez of Turbo 2 'n 1 Grips has identified a drilling technique using both the drilling angle and what he calls the “secondary” angle to the VAL.  The purpose of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE is to enhance the system begun by Lou Marquez and provide a complete system that uses the two angles and the pin to PAP distance to furnish an easy, effective, and accurate method by which a ball driller can provide a precise ball reaction for every bowler.  Again, by choosing the correct ball and then using the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE, the ball driller can provide the exact ball reaction desired for any bowler.

The drilling angle is the first decision the ball driller will make when using the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.  The range of drilling angles to choose from is from a minimum of 10° and to a maximum of 90°.  A 10° drilling will roll the soonest of all the effective drilling angles.  A 90° drilling angle will roll the latest of all the effective drilling angles.  Always keep in mind ; the entire spectrum of effective drilling angles is from 10° to 90°.  Drilling angles of 30°, 50° and 70° provide drillings that roll up between the earliest rolling 10° drilling and the latest rolling 90° drilling.  Using a small drilling angle (minimum of 10º) will cause the ball to roll sooner.  Conversely, using a large drilling angle (maximum of 90º) will cause theball to roll later.  A ball driller may choose any angle between 10° and 90°.  The common drilling angles used are 10°, 30°, 50°, 70° and 90°.

10° Drilling Angle

30° Drilling Angle

50° Drilling Angle

70° Drilling Angle

90° Drilling Angle

     

Pin and PSA distances to PAP for different Drilling Angles




The Pin to PAP Distance

The pin to PAP distance is the second component of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.  The flare potential of an undrilled ball is dominated by the total differential RG of the designed ball.  The coverstock can have a small effect on the flare potential of the ball.  The pin to PAP distance is used to control the amount of flare of the drilled ball and determines what percentage of the ball’s flare potential the drilled ball will have.  This measurement has been a key component of all drilling techniques used since flaring bowling balls have been designed and manufactured.  Larger flare patterns increase the friction between the bowling ball and the lane surface because there is a greater amount of fresh surface (no oil contamination) between the ball and the lane on larger flaring balls.  The amount of flare resulting from the pin to PAP distance chosen is different for balls with symmetrical and asymmetrical cores.  A ball driller should choose the pin to PAP distance for the ball being drilled to achieve the desired amount of flare.  The amount of flare of the drilled ball will depend on the total differential of the undrilled ball and the pin to PAP distance chosen.  The following charts show the different flare characteristics of both symmetrical and asymmetrical cored balls.




The Angle to the VAL

The angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL is the third, and final, component of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.  This angle is as important as either of the first two components of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.  The data provided by three dimensional CAD modeling of drilled bowling balls emphasizes the extent to which the RG, the intermediate (asymmetrical) differential, and the total differential of the drilled ball can be changed from those specifications of the undrilled ball.  The CAD study was done by Steve Freshour of Parkersburg, WV with a Solid Works program.  Changing the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL has a very significant effect on how much the RG and the total differential of the drilled ball changes from the same specifications of the undrilled ball.  The angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL is effective from a minimum of 20º to a maximum of approximately 70º.  Using the minimum 20º angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL will result in the drilled ball revving up quickly and transitioning the fastest at the breakpoint.  Using the maximum 70º angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL will result in the drilled ball revving up slowest and transitioning the slowest at the breakpoint.  Using a smaller angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL (minimum of 20º) will lower the RG and increase the total differential of the drilled ball. These changes will result in the ball revving up faster and transitioning quicker.  Conversely, using a larger angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL (maximum of approximately 70º) will raise the RG and lower the total differential of the drilled ball.  These changes will result in the ball revving up and transitioning slower.  A ball driller should choose the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL to achieve the desired breakpoint for the bowler.  The following charts show the change in the mass properties (RG, asymmetrical differential, total differential) between the undrilled ball and the ball drilled with the pin to PAP line at three different angles to the VAL.  The first chart is for a strong asymmetrical ball.

The second chart is for a symmetrical ball.

Keeping the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL between 20º and approximately 70º will help prevent the drilled ball from rolling over either the middle finger hole or the thumb hole.  The final determination of the largest angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL is determined by the bowler’s track.  For most bowlers, the largest “safe” angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL should result in the pin ending up just below the finger holes.  Very high track bowlers are the exception to that rule.  For very high track bowlers, the maximum angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL should result in the pin ending up just above the fingers.  A ball driller may effectively use any angle between 20º and approximately 70º for the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL. It is common to use angles of 20º, 45º and 70º for the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL.

20° Angle to the VAL

45° Angle to the VAL

70° Angle to the VAL




The Method for a DUAL ANGLE Layout

To do a DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT, a ball driller will need a Pro Sect from Turbo 2 n’ 1 Grips.  The Pro Sect has a protractor to accurately measure the angles used in the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT and a scale to measure the pin to PAP distance and to measure back to the center of the grip from the bowler’s PAP.

The first step in starting a DUAL ANGLE Layout is to draw a line through the pin and the PSA for an asymmetrical cored ball.  For a symmetrical cored ball, draw a line through the pin and the cg.  This line will provide the base line for measuring the drilling angle.

Line from the pin through the PSA of an asymmetrical cored ball Line from the pin through the cg of a symmetrical cored ball

The ball driller should measure and mark the chosen drilling angle by placing the zero point of the scale of the Pro Sect on the pin with the rib on the base line and using the protractor to measure and mark the desired drilling angle.

Mark the Drilling Angle

The ball driller should now draw the pin to PAP line by using the scale of the Pro Sect to draw a line from the pin through the marked drilling angle.

Draw the Pin to PAP Line

The ball driller has now completed marking the drilling angle on the ball to be drilled.  The next step in completing a DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT is to measure and mark the distance from the pin to the PAP on the pin to PAP line by using the scale of the Pro Sect.

Mark the Pin to PAP Distance

The ball driller has now finished the second component of a DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT by measuring and marking the pin to PAP distance.  Next, the ball driller has to measure and mark the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL by placing the zero point on the scale of the Pro Sect on the PAP and the rib on the pin to PAP line and measuring and marking the angle to the VAL using the protractor.

Marking the Angle between the Pin to PAP line and the VAL

The ball driller has to draw the VAL using the scale of the Pro Sect to complete the third and final component of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.

Drawing the VAL

The ball driller has, now, finished all three components of the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE.

COMPLETED DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT

As with all accurate drilling techniques, the ball driller measures back to the center of the grip using the vertical and horizontal components of the bowler’s axis co-ordinates to find the center of the bowler’s grip.  After drawing the centerline of the grip, perpendicular to the midline, the ball driller can now drill the ball.

Completed Ball

In summary, the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE is composed of three parts:  the drilling angle, the pin to PAP distance and the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL. Ultimately, the success of this system depends on the ability of the ball driller to make accurate choices when choosing the drilling angle, the pin to PAP distance and the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL.




The effective use of Dual Angle Layouts

The beauty of the DUAL ANGLE technique is that it allows the ball driller to keep the desired ball reaction in perspective when matching the bowler to the lane condition.  By making a good decision in choosing the pin to PAP distance, the ball driller can determine the amount of friction between the ball and the lane by controlling the track flare of the drilled ball.  Once the amount of friction is determined, the ball driller can shape the breakpoint by choosing the drilling angle and the angle to the VAL.  Adding the drilling angle and the angle to the VAL together will allow the ball driller to choose how quickly the ball will transition from skid to hook to roll.  If the two angles add up to 30º, the ball will transition as quickly as possible.  If the two angles add up to 160º, the ball will transition the slowest.  The ball driller should keep the sum of the two angles between 30º and 160º to create effective ball reactions while still allowing the ball to maintain hitting power.  The ball driller must still keep the drilling angle between 10º and 90º and the angle to the VAL between 20º and approximately 70º (depending on the bowler’s track).  Here are some guidelines for choosing the appropriate sum of the two angles to accommodate different factors:

·       The ball driller should use smaller angles sums for speed dominant players and larger angle sums for rev dominant players. The ball driller should use medium angle sums for players whose ball speed and rev rate match.

·       The ball driller should use smaller angle sums for higher axis tilt players and larger angle sums for lower tilt players.

·       The ball driller should use smaller angle sums for longer oil patterns and larger angle sums for shorter patterns.

·       The ball driller should use smaller angle sums for higher volumes of oil on the lane and larger angle sums for lower volumes of oil.

In conclusion, the sum of the drilling angle and the angle to the VAL controls how quickly the ball transitions from skid to hook to roll.  Using a smaller sum of the two angles will turn translational energy into rotational energy faster.

Even though the sum of the drilling angle and the angle to the VAL controls the rate that the ball transitions from skid to hook to roll, the ball driller can control the shape of the breakpoint by changing the relationship between the drilling angle and the angle to the VAL.  Larger drilling angles in relation to the angle to the VAL will create later, sharper breakpoints (more backend).  Smaller drilling angles in relation to the angle to the VAL will create a sooner, heavier roll (more midlane).

Conclusion

Using the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE, developed by MoRich, allows the ball driller to design precise ball reactions for any bowler on any lane condition by choosing the drilling angle, the pin to PAP distance and the angle between the pin to PAP line and the VAL.  By knowing the dynamic potential of the undrilled ball and the ball reaction desired for the bowler, the ball driller can create the exact ball motion for every bowler.  Once the ball is drilled using the DUAL ANGLE LAYOUT TECHNIQUE, it is easy to make surface adjustments to adjust the ball reaction for different lane conditions, oil patterns, and lane surfaces.    By using the system effectively, ball drillers have at their disposal all of the tools necessary to benefit every bowler who wants their help.  The responsibility for making good decisions for the drilling angle, the pin to PAP distance, and the angle to the VAL lies with the ball driller.  Bear in mind, the degree to which DUAL ANGLE layouts will be successful depends on the ability of the ball driller to make sound, rational decisions for all three components of the system.